Iain Provan will teach our Library course this year on reading and preaching the Old Testament. Iain knows the Old Testament, and he cares that it is known and preached well. He is the Marshall Sheppard Professor of Biblical Studies at Regent College, where he has taught since 1997. Prior to that he taught at the University of Edinburgh from 1989-1997, as well as at the University of Wales and King’s College London. Iain is the author of several books, including A Biblical History of Israel, co-authored with Phil Long and Tremper Longman, and commentaries on 1 and 2 Kings, Ecclesiastes, and Song of Songs. His most recent book, Seriously Dangerous Religion: What the Old Testament Really Says and Why It Matters (Baylor UP, 2014. For reviews of the book, including one by John Walton, see HERE) answers, from the perspective of the Old Testament, the most fundamental questions that face all religious and philosophical traditions, and brings these ancient texts to bear on very contemporary problems and questions. Iain writes and speaks, then, not just as an academic, but as one deeply concerned that the Old Testament would continue to shape and form God’s people for wise living—with God, with others, and with God’s world. Iain is an ordained minister of the Church of Scotland, and he and his wife Lynnette have four children, now all young adults.    

Julie Canlis will give the first two plenary lectures of this year’s Chapterhouse, and she knows and lives what she is talking about when she speaks on a theology of personhood, place, relationality and community. She is married to Matt, stays at home with their four children, and teaches Sunday School for 6-8 year olds. She likes her food slow, and her church slower. Along with Matt, she has been instrumental in the writing of, and the small group curriculum for, GODSPEED – a short film that explores the pace of life in Christ, and therefore the pace at which churches may be places (yes, places!) in which people can know and be known. In addition to the above, Julie teaches at Whitworth University in their theology MA program. She received a Ph.D. in Theology (University of St. Andrews), a Masters of Christian Studies (Regent College), and has a B.A. in Comparative History of Ideas (University of Washington). Julie wrote her doctoral dissertation on the theme of participation in Christ in the work of John Calvin, a work published as Calvin’s Ladder: A Spiritual Theology of Ascent and Ascension (Eerdmans, 2010), and awarded the Templeton Prize for Theological Promise in 2007 and the Christianity Today Award of Merit in Theology in 2011.

Using the nineteenth century Scottish theologian Thomas Erskine of Linlathen as their guide, Trevor Hart and Margaret McKerron will jointly give the third plenary lecture this year, exploring the deep connection(s) between human friendship(s) and our relationship with God. 

Trevor is Rector of Saint Andrew's Episcopal Church in St Andrews. Previously he taught theology for 30 years in the Universities of Aberdeen and St Andrews. He has published and lectured internationally on a wide range of theological themes, most recently concentrating on the conversation between Christian theology and the arts. In his spare time he enjoys bee-keeping, messing around with guitars, playing the violin and reading novels. He is married to Rachel and they have three adult children and a Border Terrier ('Grizzle'). For details of Trevor's academic profile and continuing scholarly work see his personal website.

Margaret McKerron is a Canadian doctoral student at the University of St Andrews, where she studies friendship in the intersection between historical theology and theology, imagination, and the arts. She received an MA in Interdisciplinary Studies from Regent College (2015) and a BA in Philosophy from Queens University (2011). When not lost behind a stack of books, she enjoys sharing conversation over a cup of tea, walking the Lade Braes trail, painting in oils, and writing good, old-fashioned letters. 

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Iain Provan is the Marshall Sheppard Professor of Biblical Studies at Regent College, where he has taught since 1997. Prior that that he taught at the University of Edinburgh from 1989-1997, as well as the University of Wales and King’s College London.  His most recent publications are Convenient Myths: The Axial Age, Dark Green Religion, and the World that Never Was (2013), and Seriously Dangerous Religion: What the Old Testament Really Says and Why It Matters (2014). He has also written commentaries on 1 and 2 Kings, Ecclesiastes, and Song of Songs, and A Biblical History of Israel, co-authored with Phil Long and Tremper Longman. Iain is an ordained minister of the Church of Scotland, and he and his wife Lynette have four children, now all young adults. He is also a qualified Provincial B Licence soccer coach (Canada), an ARA-certified rowing coach (UK), and a keen fly fisherman. Visit his Regent faculty page.

Matt Canlis is an ordained minister in the Church of Scotland, and currently serves at Trinity Church in Wenatchee. Previously he was the minister at Methlick Church, Aberdeenshire, for six years. Matt has his M.Lit. in Theology from the University of St. Andrew’s, his M.Div. from Regent College, and his B.A. in History from the University of Washington. Matt grew up in Seattle, washing dishes at his family restaurant and listening to his father teach John’s Gospel to business people in an upstairs room. He married his childhood sweetheart Julie and is now the father of four children. Matt serves as our Summer School Chaplain.

Julie Canlis currently teaches at Whitworth University in their theology MA program. She received a Ph.D. in Theology (University of St Andrews), a Masters of Christian Studies (emphasis in Spiritual Theology, Regent College), and has a B.A. in Comparative History of Ideas (University of Washington). Julie wrote her doctoral dissertation in Scotland, a work published as Calvin’s Ladder: A Spiritual Theology of Ascent and Ascension (Eerdmans, 2010), which grapples with Calvin’s vision for the way humanity ‘becomes itself’ by participating in Christ. It won the Templeton Prize for Theological Promise in 2007 and the Christianity Today Award of Merit for Theology in 2011. She is married to Matt, stays at home with their four children, and teaches Sunday School for 6-8 year olds. She is committed to slow food and slow church.

 
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Sharon Jebb Smith is a freelance lecturer, and speaker on literature, theology and Christian spirituality. She received her doctorate in literature and theology from the University of St Andrews, and has a Master’s from Regent College, Vancouver and an undergraduate degree in English from Queen’s University, Belfast. In her teaching and writing, she enjoys delving deeply into the two disciplines and find that exploring literature (whether fiction or non-fiction) is a very powerful way to facilitate thought and learning. She is the author of Writing God and the Self: Samuel Beckett and C.S. Lewis (Wipf & Stock, 2011). Originally from Belfast, Northern Ireland, Sharon is currently based in Aberdeen, but commutes to work, sometimes as far as Regent College, Vancouver. She is one of the main drivers behind The Abbey Summer School, along with her husband George. Visit her website and hear her lecture Of Mirth and Misery.

George Smith is an engineer specialising in the design of marine structures and frequently finds himself puzzled to how he ended up helping to organise a theological summer school! However, he loves an adventure, good people, great teaching, and fine coffee. George lives in Aberdeen and is married to Sharon.

 

Adrian Armstrong is Head of Bible Engagement for the Scottish Bible Society, and his great passion is for the people of Scotland to hear, read, experience and respond to the word of God. He read Business Studies and Law at the University of Edinburgh, and pursued a career in the corporate world following graduation, working for an international Bank. Adrian left banking to pursue theological education, obtaining an MDiv and ThM from Regent College, Vancouver. He is on the leadership team of Bellevue Chapel, Edinburgh and lives in the city with his wife Karen, and two children Alasdair and Kate.  He loves to walk and cycle, pausing to read, drink coffee and eat good food along the way. 

 

Benj Petroelje is the administrative coordinator for the Abbey. Benj and his wife, Amy, and their two daughters live in Edinburgh, where he is a doctoral student in New Testament and Christian Origins at the University of Edinburgh. Prior to moving to Scotland, Benj received an MDiv from Regent College (2013) and a BA in Biblical Literature from Taylor University (2008). Interspersed over the last decade, Benj has pastored in several different church contexts – most recently in British Columbia – and he is a Fellow of the Center for Pastor Theologians.